Pest UK Woking - PEST UK

Providing pest control services in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Essex, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, London, Middlesex, Northamptonshire, Oxfordshire, Surrey, West Midlands, West Sussex, Wiltshire. Est. 1985.

Pest UK Woking 01483 789 170

To get rid of pests from your home or business premises in Woking call PEST UK Woking 01483 789 170

About Pest UK

Pest UK are a fully insured, independent pest control company and offer a prompt response within 24-hours. Our professionally trained and qualified technicians follow the BPCA Codes of Best Practice. We provide safe, legal and effective pest control services for homes and business premises. We have vast experience in controlling pests in a variety of commercial situations
  • pubs, restaurants and hotels
  • school, college and university buildings
  • farms and stables
  • offices
  • factories
  • housing estates and apartment buildings
  • shops
Our tailor-made pest control contracts are the simplest way to proof against and deter pests in domestic and commercial premises. As a result you can avoid costly damage to your property and the spread of disease.
PEST UK Woking

33 Chertsey Rd

Woking
GU21 5AJ

01483 789 170

Pest problems we deal with

Mice and rats are prolific breeders year-round. The seek food and shelter in homes, restaurants, shops and offices, getting inside via the tiniest cracks or holes. Drains provide a perfect living environment for rats and they climb up through the pipes to enter a building.

Flies and cockroaches enter homes and business premises during the spring and summer in search of food. They are prolific breeders so an invasion of a couple of these pests soon becomes a huge infestation.

Bed bugs are very difficult to get rid of. People bring them into homes, offices and public places on their clothes or in their luggage. They can also be hidden in furnishings and clothing imported from abroad.

Fleas are brought inside by cats and dogs, and occasionally by humans on their clothes. They live in carpets and only move from the carpet to feed on animals or humans, leaving an itchy bite.

The larvae of clothes moths and carpet moths are massively destructive. A female moth lays up to 50 eggs which become larvae after a few days. They feed on wool and silk carpets, curtains, rugs and clothes. They are a problem year-round as centrally heated homes keep them active during the winter.

Birds such as gulls, pigeons and house martins roost and nest on buildings. They cause damage to roofs, solar panels and air conditioning units. Nesting materials block guttering and chimneys. They produce large amounts of droppings that smell unpleasant and are unsightly, carry diseases and corrode metals, stone and brick.

Solar panel proofing is a long-term solution to prevent pigeons roosting and nesting under the panels, preventing them causing damage that reduces their effectiveness.

Rodent proofing prevents rats, mice, squirrels, glis glis accessing a building. Ultimately it saves costs by stopping repeated call outs to pest control technicians to get rid of infestations.

Squirrels and glis glis find their way into loft spaces and cause lots of noise and damage by tearing up insulation and gnawing timber, pipes and wiring.

Wasps and honey bees often nest in chimneys, roof spaces and other cavities within buildings. Colonies can consist of thousands which are very noisy and if they’re disturbed they will sting.

Ants usually live in nests in the ground. They only invade properties in search of food, but they mostly travel in large numbers. Prevention is the best cure but because they can access a property via a tiny crack it is difficult to find how they’ve gained access.

Foxes are noisy and scream loudly at night, mark their territory with unpleasant scents and droppings, attack pets, dig up gardens and scavenge in bins. They carry disease such as mange which can be picked up by dogs and toxoplasmosis that causes blindness in children.

Ladybirds collect in huge numbers in the autumn to hibernate. They are a nuisance as there are so many of them and they secrete a yellow chemical which can stain walls, furniture and window frames

Rabbits cause damage to lawns and plants. It is a legal obligation that every occupier of land takes responsibility to prevent rabbits from causing damage.

Molehills usually appear in early winter and spring. This is when moles dig temporary shallow tunnels just below the surface of lawns and flowerbeds whilst searching for earthworms. They push up displaced soil in vertical tunnels which form the molehills.

About Woking

Woking is a large commuter belt town in Surrey. Its railway station is one of the busiest commuter stations and along with its position on the M25 motorway  it’s an extremely attractive place for London commuters to live.

It’s mentioned in the Domesday Book and had a monastery in the 8th century.

The Basingstoke Canal, completed in 1794, passes through the north of the town and is crossed by several footbridges and road bridges. The canal underwent restoration in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s with the restoration completed on 10 May 1991.

The town of Woking was formed in the area to the south of the Basingstoke Canal and around the railway station that was built in 1838 at the junction between lines to London, the south coast, and the south-west of England. There was a private railway to Brookwood Cemetery, which was developed by the London Necropolis Company as an overflow burial ground for London’s dead. As a result, the original settlement 1 mile to the south-east, on the River Wey, became known as “Old Woking”. Later, Woking Crematorium at St John’s became the first crematorium in the United Kingdom.

The Martinsyde aircraft factory set up in Woking during World War I and used the Brooklands Aerodrome for test flying. This was closed in the 1920s. The site was then used by the engineering firm James Walker & Company. The area was redeveloped in the 1990s into the Lion Retail Park.

Woking is home to the first purpose built mosque in the UK.

Woking has an energy supply that can run independently of the main power grid should that fail. It is part of Woking’s sustainable energy policy.

Woking is also home to the Tante Marie cookery school, the UK’s oldest established professional cookery school. According to the Woking News and Mail, it has now been bought by famous chef Gordon Ramsay who intends to set up his own catering college.

Woking has a Wellsian Martian Tripod, designed by Michael Condron, which was unveiled in April 1998. The tripod celebrates H.G. Wells’ book, The War of the Worlds, which was written in Woking. The Tripod is 7m tall and each leg is 17 cm in diameter. There are three parts of the sculpture: The Tripod, Bacteria, and the cylinder the tripods came to Earth in. The Martian is also shown advancing from Horsell Common.

Another piece of public art is a Hawker Hunter jet fighter mounted on a pole roughly ten metres tall situated outside the ‘Big Apple’ family entertainment complex. This is the last Hunter built and was used to promote the previous ‘Planets’ family entertainment complex. It was black but now painted silver.

Woking is home to an arts and heritage centre called ‘The Lightbox’. The modern structure, located between the Basingstoke Canal and Victoria Way dual carriageway, was designed by architects Marks Barfield, the architects of the London Eye. The Lightbox contains many hands hanging from the ceiling, a brief history of Woking and many other exhibitions. Notable past exhibitions include a Wallace and Gromit exhibition and a Leonardo da Vinci exhibition. The Lightbox also has the Ingram collection on a long-term loan; this collection is a selection of paintings and sculptures owned by Woking Football Club owner and local businessman Chris Ingram.

Woking has a modern shopping centre called The Peacocks and an older shopping area, Wolsey Place. The Peacocks Centre underwent development work in 2010 to add a new façade in the town square. An extension was added that consisted of adding glass with coloured lights that change in sequence. The Peacocks and Wolsey Place have, at present, been joined by means of a covered walkway to complement the town centre’s redevelopment. In commemoration of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the town square has been renamed “Jubilee Square”.

Woking has the largest public library in Surrey and is home to the Surrey History Centre, which holds archives and records about the county.

The tallest building in Woking is Export House, known locally as ‘The BAT Building’ (Pronounced ‘B-A-T’ or ‘Bat’), from the initials of its first tenant, British American Tobacco.[52] It is 73 metres (240 ft) tall, and has peregrine falcons nesting on top.

Monument Road is commonly thought to be so named because of an unadvertised cemetery for Muslim Indian soldiers who died in the service of the British Empire in the Great War of 1914–1918. The cemetery no longer contains graves, the corpses having been interred in the Pakistani cemetery close to the mosque, however the walls, entrance and corner towers of the cemetery still remain intact, and they bear a clearly oriental Indian style. The cemetery is located several hundred metres from Monument Road. Monument Way is probably a reference to a much earlier structure in the area that was destroyed by natural causes in the mid-1800s.

Early in the 17th century Sir Edward Zouch obtained the Manor of Woking and gained permission to demolish the old palace site. He used some of the material to build a new house – Hoe Place (now a private school) – with some of the Tudor bricks apparently being used in buildings such as The Old House in OLD WOKING and ‘The Monument’ – a tower that once stood on the hill where the Hoe Bridge Golf Course is today. It was Sir Edward’s grandson, Sir James Zouch, who obtained the Market Charter for Woking in 1661, with the Market House (opposite the entrance to Church Street) being built in 1665.”

Woking is a wealthy area with a modern and successful economy. The local schools achieve exam results above the national average. The number of managerial, professional and technical jobs in Woking is above 50%, which is above the national average. The largest and most well known employer in Woking is the McLaren Group. Other major companies in Woking include include the chemical and assembly materials company Alent plc and Ambassador Theatre Group, a major international theatre organisation. There are many offices in Woking including Fidessa, Capgemini, Mouchel, Petrofac, John Wood, SABMiller & WWF UK.

For more information about Woking see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woking

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